Video Blog: Creating Authentic Voice When Writing Dialogue

Recently, I sat down with the folks at ASU’s Piper Center for Creative Writing to talk about writing and revising, and the challenges and joys of writing historical fiction. Here is part 3 in a 4-part series from that interview.

Question 3: How conscious are your choices regarding language and diction? How do you use it to create the right tone in your work?

 

Part 1   ~   Part 2   ~   Part 3   ~    Part 4 

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Video Blog: Layering Facts into Your Historical Fiction

DNRS2014

photo by Kevin S. Moul

Recently, I sat down with the folks at ASU’s Piper Center for Creative Writing to talk about writing and revising, and the challenges and joys of writing historical fiction. Here is part 2 in a 4-part series from that interview.

Question 2: What challenges are particular to writing historical fiction? What inspires you about these challenges?

 

Part 1   ~   Part 2   ~   Part 3   ~    Part 4

 

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Video Blog: Writing the Tough Scenes

Recently, I sat down with the folks at ASU’s Piper Center for Creative Writing to talk about writing and revising, and the challenges and joys of writing historical fiction.

Here is part 1 in a 4-part series from that interview.

Question 1: In terms of technique, what is your most difficult writing challenge and what do you do to overcome it?

 

 

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Part 1   ~   Part 2   ~   Part 3   ~    Part 4

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What Cupcakes Taught Me about Life and Literature

When I was in the fourth grade, a couple of the moms made several
visits to our class to teach us "life skills." They addressed topics
like how to make new friends, to be kind to others and so on. During one visit
they announced the final week would include a cupcake party, and we were each
to place an advance order so they would know how many to bake. Most kids
ordered chocolate. A handful of us ordered vanilla, and we were promptly
derided. That's boring, the chocolate-eaters said. Vanilla isn't even a real flavor.

CupcakeThe next week, the moms arrived bearing their tasty treats. The vanilla
cupcakes had whipped cream frosting and rainbow sprinkles. The chocolate
cupcakes were plain. And the rumblings soon began. What? No fair! How come you
got frosting? Trade with me.

No trades, we vanilla-eaters gloated. That's what you get for ordering stupid-old
chocolate. We have frosting, and you don't.

The adults let us grumble and gloat for a bit, then put an end to it. Quiet
down and eat your cupcakes, they said. So we did. And a funny thing happened.
The chocolate-eaters soon discovered a delicious surprise. The moms had baked
M&M candies into the bottoms of their cupcakes. A rich, colorful, chocolate
bonus. Huzzah! Chocolate was the best
choice after all, or so the complainers said.

That's when the moms explained their little experiment to us. Explained
how important it is to be grateful for what we receive, even when we might feel
someone else has something better. Explained that sometimes, even when life
seems most unfair, we could discover something unexpected, something wonderful,
something better than what we thought
we wanted.

Blah, blah, blah.

At the time, the message was lost on us kids. We mostly felt
manipulated, used, a bit like lab rats. Yet, their lesson seeped into my
subconscious and stayed with me. They were right, of course. It's not always
easy advice to follow, but they were 100 percent spot on.

As adults, too often, we're not a whole lot more mature than that group
of fourth graders — criticizing, teasing and judging others for their choices.
I've most recently experienced this phenomenon during discussions about books
and the differences between commercial and literary fiction. People are quick
to condemn others' reading preferences. You like literary fiction? That's so boring.
Oh, you read chick lit. Those books are trashy. Is that sci-fi? Why waste your time
reading about something that could never really happen?

Why can't we just say, Hey! You're reading a book. Cool. How is it?

With the explosion of e-books and print-on-demand publishing
technology, books have become much more accessible than they once were. There
are literally millions of books out there. Far too many for one person to ever
read. So why not celebrate the variety? Maybe that so-called boring literary
novel, if you take the time to savor it, just might have a  delicious, satisfying surprise in the end.
And perhaps the chick lit that seems to be all whipped cream and sprinkles just
might satisfy your craving for a happy ending.

Those of us who write for a living, or aspire to, would be especially
wise to heed this advice.

For one thing, reading a wide range of genres expands our minds,
introduces us to new ideas and teaches us about good writing (or, sometimes,
about not-so-good writing, but that's also a beneficial thing). A voracious
reading appetite just might lead us to discover something unexpected, something
wonderful, something better than what we thought
we wanted from a book. That makes us stronger writers.

For another thing, having respect for all kinds of readers empowers us
to break barriers and attract fans to our stories that we might not have
anticipated. My debut historical novel, for example, was marketed as women's
fiction. Yet, I've received several amazing, thoughtful reviews from male
readers who were moved by the book's multiple perspectives on slavery and
freedom, and its universal themes of self-reliance, perseverance and hope.

It's just like those bakeries that have sprung up all over the place
that serve only cupcakes. You know
the ones. Dozens of flavors and combinations. Red velvet, pumpkin, peanut
butter chocolate, lemon-ginger, you name it. It blows my fourth-grade mind.

Eat whatever cupcake you want, and read whatever book you like. Don't
judge others for their choices. And don't be afraid to sample something different
once in a while. Have a chai latte cupcake with your historical fiction, or try
a rocky road cupcake with your paranormal thriller. It's all good.

 

p.s. A shout-out and long-overdue thank you to my fourth grade teacher
at Madison Park Elementary School, Mrs. Kuzmanoff, and the moms, Mrs. Free and
Mrs. Lawson, who took the time to share their talents and insights (and
cupcakes) with us kids.

 

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Charting a Writing Career Path


little girl on the roadBlogger Karen Randau recently interviewed me about my
professional writing path and my thoughts on publishing with a small press. She
did a wonderful job of distilling our conversation into a helpful article for
aspiring authors. I invite you to visit her blog to read the article, “Get
Your Foot in the Publishing Door Through a Small Press
.”

 

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Winning the What If Game

 

Phoenix Zoo, 1973

Daddy, what if the bridge breaks and the alligators eat me? My dad, brother and me at the Phoenix Zoo alligator exhibit, 1973. (Mom stayed on solid land and snapped the picture.)

All throughout my childhood, my parents had a mantra they’d
say to me when I’d get worked up and worried about the future. “Nothing
happens until it does.” It’s ironic, because they worried about things all
the time and still do. It’s sound wisdom, though, and I make a daily effort to
embrace it. It’s especially salient for fiction writers when it comes to the
“life” portion of “the writing life.”

As writers, we love to play the “what if?” game.
We’re relaxing at the coffee shop or waiting in line at the post office or pulling
into the parking lot at the day job. Then it strikes. What if that guy who just
bought a vanilla latte is secretly in love with the barista? What if the woman
in line ahead of me is about to learn she has an incurable disease? What if the
people sitting in that parked car are plotting to overthrow the government?

It’s how good ideas and compelling fiction are born.

We writers get so practiced at playing this game, that it often
invades our writing pursuits in less-fun ways, too. What if I spend years
writing this novel and nobody reads it? What if I pour my heart into this book
and then somebody else publishes one just like it before mine is complete? What
if my writing sucks?

Sure, all those things could happen. Absolutely. Or not. Nothing happens until it does. Don’t let
the fear of failure paralyze you or even slow you down when it comes to chasing
your dreams. Just write. Write the best damn novel or short story or magazine
article or poem or (insert your dream here) that you can. Study the craft.
Enjoy the process. And see what happens when it does.

Start asking yourself more positive questions. What if I
spend years writing this novel and everybody loves it? What if I work hard on
this novel and people say it’s one of a kind? What if my writing shines?

One of my favorite quotes is from prolific
writer and New York Times bestselling
author Laurence Shames. He said, “Success and failure. We think of them as
opposites, but they’re really not. They’re companions.” He’s spot on. Every
day, I write something. Every day, I fail at it. And, every day, I improve as a
writer. I see my shortcomings. I revise my prose. I succeed.

Here’s a “what if” question for you, one you can
print off and pin on your wall. “What if I work hard on this novel and I learn
something important about writing, about myself and about life?”

What if, indeed. 

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Giving Thanks for Great Books

My reading each year is an eclectic gambit. Books include a blend of new
and classic fiction in multiple genres, as well as tomes on the writing craft
and research for my historical novel-in-progress. Of the 20-plus books I read
in 2012, a handful stand out as exceptional and unique. I highly recommend the
following books. They are great reads and would make great holiday gifts for
the readers in your life.





Light Between OceansThe
Light Between Oceans

A stunning debut by this
Australian novelist. The Light Between Oceans grabbed my attention from the
opening pages and held it until the very last. By page 100, it was
unputdownable and I finished reading it in a day or two. It's a uniquely
crafted story about love and loss, grief and anger, right and wrong — and
about how difficult it can sometimes be in life to draw a clear line between
any of them. The book was beautifully written, and the supporting characters
were just as compelling and important as the main characters.



Snow ChildThe
Snow Child

This story and its
characters lingered in my thoughts for days and weeks after I finished reading
it.  I loved it. It's sad and sweet and
magical and lush. This story pulls at your heart in so many ways. The author
does an amazing job of developing the characters so that you get to know each
of them, and grow to love them. I didn't want the book to end, to say good-bye.
Ivey' description of the 1920s Alaska wilderness is also amazing and the novel
is worth the read for that alone.




Night CircusThe
Night Circus

Captivating! This book was
great fun to read. Intriguing and vivid, beautifully told story. Complex and
richly layered with many interesting characters, yet an easy read. Pure
entertainment.



Tree in BrooklynA
Tree Grows in Brooklyn

I had been meaning to read
this classic coming-of-age story for years, and I'm so glad I finally did.
Completely fell in love with young Francie Nolan and her family, immigrants who
strived to make a better life for their children in poverty-stricken Brooklyn
in the early 1900s. Heartbreaking and hopeful at the same time, this book had
me both smiling and fighting back tears many times. As I reached the final
pages, I slowed down my reading, because I just didn't want to say good-bye to
the characters.


Artists WayThe
Artist's Way

A thought-provoking read. The
general idea is that we all were created and thus we all have creativity within
us yearning to be expressed. We are all artistic in our own way, and when we
allow ourselves to express that we are happy. If you've ever dreamed of doing
something creative (whether it's ballroom dancing, painting your living room,
writing a novel, or knitting a sweater), you owe it to yourself to just do it.
"Stop telling yourself that creativity is a luxury." Or that it's too
late or not practical. Allow yourself to let go and do what you want to do, and
learn to ignore the well-meaning (or not so well-meaning) naysayers and devil's
advocates. Don't worry about whether your art is any "good." Leave
that to whatever higher power in which you believe. The simple act of
"doing" will lead to good things.



Leopold bioAldo
Leopold: A Fierce Green Fire

This was an interesting
biography of a man who inspired generations of conservationists. Fabulous
research for my historical novel-in-progress about the Dust Bowl.

 

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Playing with Words and Book Spine Poetry

Book spine poemMake no mistake, I'm not a poet. Yet playing with poetry is a great way to exercise your mind. It's like Sudoku, only with words. It can help you focus your thoughts, work through a personal challenge, express deep emotions,  or look at the world in a new way. I've written a handful of poems in my day, none of which will ever be seen by any other than my own eyes. They're just for me.

Except this one. Photos of book spine poetry have been floating around the internet lately. They looked like a lot of fun, so I decided to give it a shot and share the results. Crafting book spine poems is an easy way to express your creativity and exercise your mind. Anyone can do it.

Here's my poem about writing a novel, using books from my bookshelves (click on the picture to see larger image). If you don't own a lot of books, plan a trip to the library. Give it a try! 


 

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Finding the Line Between Fact and Fiction in Historical Novels

Research book stackI’m so happy to be a guest author this week on Women’s Fiction Writers blog, talking about the line between fact and fiction in historical novels, how women’s fiction can be found in many genres, and more.

Created by author Amy Sue Nathan, WFW is the go-to blog for the craft and business of traditionally published women’s fiction. It features interviews and guest posts by published women’s fiction authors and tips on writing, editing, publishing and the writing life.  Please stop by and share your thoughts.

Author Jessica McCann Says Women’s Fiction Falls Within Many Genres, Including Historical Fiction


Behind the Scenes: The Making of a Book Trailer

Behind the scenes Curious about how authors and publishers create book trailers for their new releases? Mari Pfeiffer of Wolf and Redhood Media was, after viewing the trailer for my novel All Different Kinds of Free. She extended an invitation for an interview, and I was delighted to accept. Her questions were insightful and fun.

Visit the Wolf and Redhood Media website to read the interview: Author Jessica McCann Talks about the Making of her Trailer for All Different Kinds of Free.

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